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Blue Mountains Wildflowers
Boronias, Guinea Flowers & Heaths
Pink Swamp Heath Pink Swamp Heath
Boronias (Family Rutaceae) includes the Boronia, Correa, Leionema, Phebalium and Zieria. It also includes citrus fruit.

A principal factor in identifying Guinea Flowers is the number and position of their stamens and carpels. For example the Blue Mountains Guinea Flower has about 16 yellow stamens and two green carpels.

Heaths. Family Epacridaceae, or Southern Heaths, has recently been absorbed into the Family Ericaceae (Northern Heaths). Northern Heaths includes Rhododendrons and Azaleas.

Index to our collection -

Family Rutaceae
Deane's Boronia
Pale Pink Boronia
Narrow-leaved Boronia
Small Leaved Boronia
Stiff Boronia
Sydney Boronia

Coveny's Zieria
Leionema lachnaeoides
Rough Wax Plant
Shiny Phebalium
Smooth Zieria
Wax Flower
Guinea Flowers
Blue Mountains
   Guinea Flower
Brown Guinea Flower
Erect Guinea Flower
Golden Guinea Flower
Grey Guinea Flower
Leafy Guinea Flower
Tall Guinea Flower
Thyme Guinea Flower
Heaths
Blunt Beard-heath
Blunt-leaf Heath
Coral Heath
Daphne Heath
Epacris crassifolia
Fuchsia Heath
Keeled Heath
Lance Beard-heath
Leucopogon setiger
Necklace Heath
NSW Coral Heath
Pink Beard-heath
Pink Swamp Heath
Prickly Broom Heath
Red Five Corners
Rock Sprengelia
Snow Wreath
Swamp Heath

Family Rutaceae
There's an estimated 50 species of the Rutaceae family in the Blue Mountains.
Boronia genus

The fragrance from Boronias comes from the oil in the leaves - and this requires a sunny day for it to be released. There's an estimated 16 Boronia species in the Blue Mountains. Unlike most members of the Rutaceae family, Boronias have 4 petals - as do Zierias.

Small Leaved Boronia
Small Leaved Boronia

Boronia microphylla
Flowering in spring and summer, the shape of its leaves characterise this small plant.
Here's another image.
Stiff Boronia
Stiff Boronia

Boronia rigens
Tiny white flowers barely 5mm across, and usually not fully opened, help identify this plant. However, one needs to look closely to see the 8 stamens which characterise Boronias.
Here's another image.
Sydney Boronia
Sydney Boronia

Boronia ledifolia
Flowering in late winter through spring, its stems are a rusty colour.
Its sepals help identify it.
It is also known as the Ledum Boronia.
Here's another image.
Pale Pink Boronia
Pale Pink Boronia

Boronia floribunda
Producing a mass of soft pink to white flowers in spring and early summer.
This image shows a close up of the flower and the distinctive leaves.
Deane's Boronia
Deane's Boronia

Boronia deanei subsp. deanei
This threatened species is classed as "vulnerable" and is restricted to the Blue Mountains & Kanangra-Boyd area.
Here's another image and image.
Narrow-leaved Boronia
Narrow-leaved Boronia

Boronia anemonifolia
subsp. anemonifolia
Recognised by its shiny narrow fork like leaves, it is also known as Sticky Boronia.
The flowers are about 1cm across.
Here's another image.
Other genera of the family Rutaceae

Wax Flower
Wax Flower

Philotheca obovalis
Previously known as Eriostemon obovalis, it is easily identified by its warty heart shaped leaves - although only warty on the underside.
The flowers are 20 mm wide and appear in Spring.
Rough Wax Plant
Rough Wax Plant

Philotheca hispidula
Its 25mm long leaves that have rough edges ("glandular-crenate") and a bent tip ("mucronate") identify it.
Previously known as Eriostemon hispidulus.
Here's another image.

Leionema genus

Leionema lachnaeoides
Leionema lachnaeoides


This endangered plant is only found in exposed areas of the upper Blue Mountains. Its stunning flowers are about 10mm across.
Its revolute (tightly recurved) leaves help identify it.
Here's another image and an image that shows a pollinator.
Leionema lamprophyllum subsp. orbiculare
Shiny Phebalium

Leionema lamprophyllum
subsp. orbiculare
Identified by its circular warty leaves - as shown in this image.
It grows in exposed ridges between Dunns Swamp and Newnes Plateau.

Zieria genus

Coveny's Zieria
Coveny's Zieria

Zieria covenyi
This endangered species is only found on the Narrow Neck Plateau in the Blue Mountains National Park.
Smooth Zieria
Smooth Zieria

Zieria laevigata
It's identified by the ridges on its branchlets.
Here's another image and another.

Guinea Flowers - family Dilleniaceae - genus Hibbertia

The Dilleniaceae family is only represented by the Hibbertia genus in the Blue Mountains - but there are over 20 species. The name Guinea Flower comes from the gold guinea coin.

Erect Guinea Flower
Erect Guinea Flower

Hibbertia riparia
This small Guinea Flower is common in the Upper Blue Mountains.
It is identified by its 4 yellow stamens, 2 green carpels and leaves having two grooves running along their lower surface.
Brown Guinea Flower
Brown Guinea Flower

Hibbertia rufa
Easily identified by its browny-red stem and glossy leaves.
It has 4 stamens and 2 carpels.
Thyme Guinea Flower
Thyme Guinea Flower

Hibbertia serpyllifolia
It has 12 stamens and 3 carpels, but is best identified by its 5mm narrow recurved warty leaves.
I imagine it gets its name from the similarity its leaves have to the younger leaves of the Common Thyme.
Leafy Guinea Flower
Leafy Guinea Flower

Hibbertia monogyna
It has 10-12 stamens and 1 carpel, but is best identified by its recurved point at the end of the leaves - as more clearly shown in this image.
Golden Guinea Flower
Golden Guinea Flower

Hibbertia scandens
One of several climbing guinea flowers, it is recognised by its large flower - up to 9cm wide. It has 30+ stamens and 3-7 carpels.
The edges of its leaves can be either smooth or toothed - as shown on this image.
Grey Guinea Flower
Grey Guinea Flower

Hibbertia obtusifolia
An erect shrub to 60cm tall, its grey hairy foliage and hairy branches identify it.
It has over 30 stamens and 3 carpels.
It's also known as the Hoary Guinea Flower.
Tall Guinea Flower
Tall Guinea Flower

Hibbertia saligna
A shrub to 2m tall, its furry leaves help identify it.
It has 20 to 30 stamens and 3 carpels.
Here's another image.
Blue Mountains Guinea Flower
Blue Mountains
Guinea Flower

Hibbertia bracteata
An erect shrub about 1m tall.
It has around 16 stamens and 2 carpels.
Its hairy bracts and the mucro at the end of its leaves, as shown in this image, help identify it.

Common Heath
The Common Heath

Epacris impressa
Heaths (family Ericaceae)

There's over 60 species of the Ericaceae family in the Blue Mountains.

The most common genus is the Epacris genus with 18 species, followed by the Leucopogon genus with 14.

Epacris genus

The Common Heath (Epacris impressa) is Victoria's floral emblem.
It is most probably not found as far north as the Blue Mountains.

NSW Coral Heath
NSW Coral Heath

Epacris pulchella
Flowering from late summer to early Autumn with usually white flowers, but occasionally light pink, characterise this stunning plant.
It is also known as the Wallum Heath.
Coral Heath
Coral Heath

Epacris microphylla
Flowering in spring, it has tightly grouped 3mm wide flowers that cover the erect branch.
Here's another image.
Fuchsia Heath
Fuchsia Heath

Epacris reclinata
This plant can be found in shade or full sun rooted into rock crevices. Its 15mm long flowers appear from mid winter through to early summer.
Blunt-leaf Heath
Blunt-leaf Heath

Epacris obtusifolia
A hardy plant that thrives in exposed heath. Identified by the blunted tip to its leaves.
Epacris crassifolia subsp. crassifolia
Epacris crassifolia
subsp. crassifolia

As shown in this image, it has reddish young branches and its leaves have several veins.
Its corolla (flower tube) is around 6mm in length.
Swamp Heath
Swamp Heath

Epacris paludosa
Its hairy branches and distinctive 10mm long lance like leaves help to identify it.
It is also known as the Alpine Heath.
Keeled Heath
Keeled Heath

Epacris rigida
Distinguished from E. muelleri by the keel under its 3mm finely toothed leaves.
Here's another image.
Leucopogon genus

Leucopogons are easily recognised by their hairy mouths.

Lance Beard-heath
Lance Beard-heath

Leucopogon lanceolatus
var. lanceolatus

The spikes of flowers in spring and the 3 to 5 prominent veins on its leaves identifies this plant.
Here's an image of its fruit.
Blunt Beard-heath
Blunt Beard-heath

Leucopogon muticus
Its longer wider recurved leaves help identify it. As does the usual blunt end to its leaves - most Leucopogons tend to come to a point.
Its flowers are borne on spikes.
Here's another image.
Lance Beard-heath
Leucopogon setiger

Identified by its leaves at right-angles to its branches and its one or two flowers on a longer peduncle (stalk).
Here's an image with a pollinator, and its erect pungent leaves.
Pink Beard-heath
Pink Beard-heath

Leucopogon ericoides
Just a hint of pink - but not enough to identify it.
Its recurved pungent leaves that are at 45° to the branch and more than two flowers on a short stalk is a good indicator.
Here's an image with a pollinator.

Other heath genera
Pink Swamp Heath
Pink Swamp Heath

Sprengelia incarnata
Flowering in winter and spring, the second layer of five petals are sepals.
Snow Wreath
Snow Wreath

Woollsia pungens
Flowering in late winter, its 10mm wide flowers have a strong fragrance.
Also recognised by the ripples on its petals.
This is the only species in this genus.
Daphne Heath
Daphne Heath

Brachyloma daphnoides
Its name is due to the fragrance of the flowers. The red tip of its leaves helps identify it.
Necklace Heath
Necklace Heath

Dracophyllum secundum
This spring flowering heath is easily recognised by its red flower stem and leaves. Each flower is about 10mm in length.
Red Five Corners
Red Five Corners

Styphelia tubiflora
Its red flowers make this plant stand out in winter. The flowers are 20mm long, and the pointy leaves are sharp.
Prickly Broom Heath
Prickly Broom Heath

Monotoca scoparia
Identified by the veins under its pointed leaves and that its flowers don't have a beard like the Leucopogons.
Here's another image.
Rock Sprengelia
Rock Sprengelia

Sprengelia monticola
This species is only found in sheltered damp cliff faces in the upper Blue Mountains. Its flowers are 10-12mm wide.
Here's another image, and another and another.
(Too good to leave in the bottom drawer.)
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