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Blue Mountains Wildflowers
Smaller Floral Families
Pink Flannel Flower Pink Flannel Flower
Smaller Families - but certainly not lesser.

This set of wildflowers is "simply" those that belong to smaller floral families - of which there are over 100 families with over 800 species in the Blue Mountains.

The largest family is the grasses - Family Poaceae - with 130 species. However, this website doesn't cover this family - yet.

Index to our collection -

Andromeda Pomaderris
Angel Sword
Apple Berry
Bearded Tylophora
Bitter Cryptandra
Black Sassafras
Black Wattle
Black-eyed Susan
Blue Dampiera
Blunt Sandalwood
Broad-leaf Star Hair
Broom Milkwort
Broom Spurge
Bursaria longisepala
Calliopsis *
Carrot Tops
Creamy Candles
Common Dog-violet *
Daisy-leaved Goodenia
Elderberry Panax
Euphrasia bowdeniae
Fairies’ Wings
Fish Bones
Forked Comb Fern
Forked Sundew
Grass Triggerplant
Greater Periwinkle *
Headache Vine
Heath-leaved Poranthera
Hop Goodenia
Lesser Flannel Flower
Louisa's Mistletoe
Many-flowered Mat-rush
Matchheads
Mistletoe
Mountain Blueberry
Narrow-leaf Logania
Narrow-leaved Triggerplant
Native Parsnip
Native Sarsaparilla
Native Violet
Oak-leaved Olearia
Olax
Old Man’s Beard
Pink Flannel Flower
Purple Coopernookia
Purple Dampiera
Purple Eyebright
Rice-flower Pseudanthus
River Rose
Rusty Velvet-bush
Sandstone Violet
Scented Marsdenia
Scotch Thistle *
Silky Daisy Bush
Single Bladderwort
Slender Rice Flower
Slender Stackhousia
Slender Violet-bush
Small St. John's Wort
Snake Flower
Spiny-headed Mat-rush
Sweet Pittosporum
Sydney Flannel Flower
Tarata *
Thyme Mitrewort
Thyme Spurge
Tree Triggerplant
Tree Violet
Triggerplant
Variable-leaved Goodenia
Varied Mitrewort
White Marianth
White Root
White Sour Bush
Woolly Xanthosia
* Introduced species (weed)

Family Goodeniaceae

Snake Flower
Snake Flower

Scaevola ramosissima
Small summer flowering climber with distinctive flowers and leaves.
Also known as the Purple Fan-flower.
Blue Dampiera
Blue Dampiera

Dampiera stricta
Distinctive, mainly due to its colour. Also identified by its diamond shaped leaves. Flowering most of the year, but best in spring.
Also see our Blue Dampiera web page.
Here's an image of a white variant.
Purple Dampiera
Purple Dampiera

Dampiera purpurea
Although its flowers are very similar to the Blue Dampiera in shape, their purple colour is a give away.
Its oval leaves are also very different.
Daisy-leaved Goodenia
Daisy-leaved Goodenia

Goodenia bellidifolia
Summer flowering, usually with single flowers along the stem with several at the "crown". Flowers are 10mm across.
Variable-leaved Goodenia
Variable-leaved Goodenia

Goodenia heterophylla
subsp. montana

Flowering from Spring through to Autumn, the subspecies montana is recognised by its hairy revolute leaves.
Here's another image.
Hop Goodenia
Hop Goodenia

Goodenia decurrens
Its initial growth is cunningly disguised as a broad-leaf weed, but once in flower it is 5-10cm long and 2cm wide leaves which identifies it.
Here's another image.
Purple Coopernookia
Purple Coopernookia

Coopernookia barbata
Previously called Purple Goodenia (Goodenia barbata), its flowers are 15mm wide.
Its recurved leaves are 20mm long and 2mm wide.
Here's an image showing a profile of its flower plus a pollinator.

Family Apiaceae

Besides Flannel Flowers and Pennyworts, this family includes carrots and celery and a host of herbs such as parsley, coriander and fennel. Also see our Flannel Flowers web page.

Pink Flannel Flower
Pink Flannel Flower

Actinotus forsythii
Also known as the Ridge Flannel Flower, this endangered flower only appears in the season following bush fires.
The flowers are 20mm in diameter.
Sydney Flannel Flower
Sydney Flannel Flower

Actinotus helianthi
Its felt like petals tipped in the softest pale green make this a favourite of many.
The leaves are also a feature of this plant.
The flowers are 50mm in diameter.
Lesser Flannel Flower
Lesser Flannel Flower

Actinotus minor
A small plant with flowers up to 12mm across. Like its siblings, it doesn't have petals, the petal-like part are bracts.
It seems to always be in flower.
Carrot Tops
Carrot Tops

Platysace linearifolia
Flowering in Autumn, Carrot Tops is best identified by the bouquet of tiny (3mm across) flowers at the end of a long and oblique stalk.
Native Parsnip
Native Parsnip

Platysace lanceolata
This is the mountain heath form whose leaves are broad. A variety found in the Lane Cove National Park has lance like leaves.
Woolly Xanthosia
Woolly Xanthosia

Xanthosia pilosa
This small plant is recognised by its hairy variable leaves and tiny yellow flowers.
The leaves are sometimes lobed; sometimes diamond shaped; and, of course, sometimes neither. The latter two are shown on the specimen found in the Lane Cove National Park.
It flowers for much of the year, but mainly in Summer.

Family Apocynaceae

Bearded Tylophora
Bearded Tylophora

Tylophora barbata
A climbing vine recognised by its distinct brown hairy flowers which are 8mm across.
Scented Marsdenia
Scented Marsdenia

Marsdenia suaveolens
A climbing vine with an umbel* of white flowers (5mm wide) in summer. The fruit is 5cm in length.
Here's an image that shows the umbel.
[* umbel: an inflorescence in which all flower stalks arise from one point.]
The NSW Flora Online shows three Marsdenia species in the Central Tablelands region. As far as I can ascertain -

M. flavescens has smaller (3mm wide) yellow flowers and its vine stems are thinner and pubescent (covered in short weak hairs).

M. rostrata has larger (10mm wide) pale yellow flowers and ovate (oval-ish) leaves and fruit.
Greater Periwinkle
Greater Periwinkle

Vinca major
Introduced species (weed)
A native of the Mediterranean, its blue five petal fan-like flowers identifies it.
It is also known as Blue Periwinkle and Vinca.

Family Araliaceae

Elderberry Panax
Elderberry Panax

Polyscias sambucifolia
This species appears to have variable leaves and an evolving set of subspecies.
This image shows its flowers and a leaves.
This image shows its pinnate leaves.
This image shows its developed fruit.
Broad-leaf Star Hair
Broad-leaf Star Hair

Astrotricha latifolia
A tall leggy shrub, that has a baffling appearance when young - see this image. This image was taken a full year before the flowering image.
Its broad leaves can be 20cm long and 8cm wide. The flowers are 4mm wide.
Its light green petals distinguish it from A. longifolia whose petals are whitish.

Family Asteraceae

Silky Daisy Bush
Silky Daisy Bush

Olearia erubescens
The shiny prickly leaves helps identify this species, as does the redness underneath the leaves. The newer leaves are dark red.
Here's another image.
Calliopsis
Calliopsis

Coreopsis lanceolata
Introduced species (weed)
Prolific and spreading - best describes this plant. It's a native of North America and flowers in late spring and into summer. It's found along railway lines and roadsides.
Scotch Thistle
Scotch Thistle

Onopordum acanthium
Introduced species (weed)
Native of Europe & western Asia.
It is Scotland's floral emblem.
Oak-leaved Olearia
Oak-leaved Olearia

Olearia quercifolia
This endangered species is confined to the Blue Mountains. It's identified by its oak-like leaves which are around 40mm long and 20mm wide.
Here's another image and another.

Family Cunoniaceae

River Rose
River Rose

Bauera rubioides
A unique plant - with its pink flowers hanging down and its six leaves radiating from the stem. It flowers in spring and summer and prefers sheltered damp embankments.
It is also known as the Dog Rose.
Here's another image and another.
Black Wattle
Black Wattle

Callicoma serratifolia
With flowers that resemble some of those of the acacia family, this beautiful tree grows over 10 metres high along watercourses. It flowers in spring.
Here's another image.
This image shows its dramatic new growth.

Family Elaeocarpaceae

Genera Tetratheca - Black-eyed Susans

Genera Tetratheca formerly belonged to the Tremandraceae family. This family has now been absorbed into the Elaeocarpaceae family.

The NSW Flora Online describes some 14 species that occur in New South Wales. The species are collectively called Black-eyed Susans, and their similarity to each other provides a real challenge in identifying them.

Black-eyed Susan
Black-eyed Susan

Tetratheca ericifolia
Identified by its recurved, slightly hairy leaves with tubercles (bumps) on the edges and tapered at the end. The leaf is not that dissimilar to that of Banksia ericifolia (except for the tapering at the end).
Black-eyed Susan
Black-eyed Susan

Tetratheca rupicola
Similar to Tetratheca ericifolia but without the hairs and tubercles. Interestingly, its red branchlets are not mentioned in references.

Genera Elaeocarpus

There are 10 species in NSW; 3 in the Blue Mountains. Although they all have "blueberry" in their common name, they are not part of the blueberry family. Blueberries are members of the Heath family.

Mountain Blueberry
Mountain Blueberry

Elaeocarpus holopetalus
Distinguished from E. kirtonii and E. reticulatus by is shorter leaves (3-7cm) and its pubescent (hairy) under surface of its leaves. It flowers in late spring.
Here's a close-up image of its flowers and an image of its berries.

Family Euphorbiaceae

Broom Spurge
Broom Spurge

Amperea xiphoclada
A small broom-like shrub with characteristic square-ish branches. The inflorescence is about 5mm across.

Family Phyllanthaceae

Family Phyllanthaceae was formerly part of the Euphorbiaceae family - see NSW Flora Online for more details.

Thyme Spurge
Thyme Spurge

Phyllanthus hirtellus
A small shrub whose shiny and hairy leaves are about 6mm long, and are often bent at the tip. The variety that has red male flowers (shown here) only occurs in the Sydney region.
Heath-leaved Poranthera
Heath-leaved Poranthera

Poranthera ericifolia
A small plant to about 30cm high. Its recurved shiny leaves are about 12-15mm in length.
The flower-heads are held at the end of long branching stems and contain both male and female flowers.
The female flowers have red styles - only 3 styles, but they are bifid (divided in two).
The male flowers are shown more clearly on the Lane Cove National Park specimen.

Family Picrodendraceae

Family Picrodendraceae was formerly part of the Euphorbiaceae family - see NSW Flora Online for more details.

Rice-flower Pseudanthus
Rice-flower Pseudanthus

Pseudanthus pimeleoides
At first glance it looks like a white Dahlia.
(The Dahlia is Mexico's national flower.)
Flowering in Spring, the flower head contains multiple flowers. The name Rice-flower Pseudanthus is not widely used.

Family Lobeliaceae

White Root
White Root

Pratia purpurascens
A delightful little plant with a self explanatory name. The undersides of its leaves are purplish. Its 10mm flowers appear in the warmer months.
Angel Sword
Angel Sword

Lobelia dentata
This delicate little flower appears in spring and summer. It can have a vibrant electric blue colour, that I have (as yet) been unable to capture.

Family Loganiaceae

Varied Mitrewort flower bud
There are six species of the Mitrasacme genus (the Mitreworts) in NSW - five of which are probably found in the Blue Mountains.

The orange flower bud is shaped like a bishop's hat - which is called a mitre - thus its name.

Missing from the gallery below are M. alsinoides, M. paludosa and M. pilosa.

Thyme Mitrewort
Thyme Mitrewort

Mitrasacme serpyllifolia
The easiest of the Mitrewort siblings to identify - due to its negligible pedicel (stalk).
[The botanical word for this is "sessile".]
Its flowers are 6mm wide; its leaves are 6mm long and 2mm wide.
Varied Mitrewort
Varied Mitrewort

Mitrasacme polymorpha
Identified by its multiple flowers, it is also leggier (at 25cm) than its siblings.
It has very hairy branches and leaves.
This image shows the multiple flowers.
Narrow-leaf Logania
Narrow-leaf Logania

Logania albiflora
Its bell-like 2-3mm long sweet smelling flowers identifies it.
Here's another image.

Family Lomandraceae

Fish Bones
Fish Bones

Lomandra obliqua
The easiest member of the Lomandra genus to identify due to its 'fish bone" like leaves. It flowers in spring.
Spiny-headed Mat-rush
Spiny-headed Mat-rush

Lomandra longifolia
Also known as Honey Reed, both its thorns and leaves can inflict pain. Very hardy and flowers in spring.
Spiny-headed Mat-rush
Many-flowered Mat-rush

Lomandra multiflora
subsp. multiflora
Its striking floral display easily identifies this Lomandra.
Here's a close-up of its inflorescence - which is 3cm across.
Here's another image of the plant.

Family Pittosporaceae

Apple Berry
Apple Berry

Billardiera scandens
Flowering in spring, its 20mm flowers become purple edible fruit. This climber is also known as Dumplings.
Sweet Pittosporum
Sweet Pittosporum

Pittosporum undulatum
A tree to about 8 metres in height, it has scores of white flowers in spring which progress to orange coloured berries by autumn.
Also see our Sweet Pittosporum web-page.
White Marianth
White Marianth

Rhytidosporum procumbens
Also known as Mary's Flower, it is a small plant whose flowers are only 8mm wide.
Bursaria longisepala
Bursaria longisepala

Identified by its thorns and rosettes of dark green leaves, this small shrub is restricted to the Blue Mountains region.
Flowering in summer, its flowers are 8mm across.
Here's another image.
Tarata
Tarata

Pittosporum eugenioides
Introduced species (weed)
A native of New Zealand.
Also known as Lemonwood due to the lemon fragrance of its crushed leaves.
Here's another image.

Family Polygalaceae

There are six species of this family in the Blue Mountains. One species is Polygala japonica, the other 5 belong to the Comesperma genus - of which C. retusum and C. volubile have so far alluded me.

Matchheads
Matchheads

Comesperma ericinum
A tall leggy shrub over a metre high. Its mauve flowers appear in spring. Also known as Pyramid Flower, Pink Matchheads and Heath Milkwort.
Fairies’ Wings
Fairies' Wings

Comesperma defoliatum
Also known as Leafless Milkwort, C. defoliatum is about half the size of C. sphaerocarpum and they look very similar.
Broom Milkwort
Broom Milkwort

Comesperma sphaerocarpum
Its wing sepals are 6mm across - compared to that of Fairies' Wings which are 2-3mm across.
Family Rhamnaceae

Andromeda Pomaderris
Andromeda Pomaderris

Pomaderris andromedifolia
Pomaderris plants are in bud for months before they bloom, and are also hard to distinguish from each other. I have deduced that the above specimen is Pomaderris andromedifolia, as its flowers are yellow and have petals. Its leaves are 30mm long, 10 mm wide, hairless above, but very felty below.
The name Andromeda Pomaderris is not widely used.
Bitter Cryptandra
Bitter Cryptandra

Cryptandra amara var. amara
A tiny plant - its aged-looking branches making it look like a bonsai.
Its spine-like branches help identify it.
Its 3mm long flowers start out white, and then become pink, and eventually are a dusky pink with a "red centre".
Bitter Cryptandra
Bitter Cryptandra

Cryptandra amara var. amara
Its leaves are 3mm long and 1 mm wide.

There are three varieties -
amara - shown here
floribunda - doesn't have spiny branches
longiflora - has flowers up to 6mm.

Family Santalaceae

The family includes the Native Cherry (Exocarpos cupressiformis), the Australian Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) and Quandong (Santalum acuminatum ). Here's an informative treatment of the Santalum genus.

White Sour Bush
White Sour Bush

Choretrum candollei
A blaze of tiny white flowers - barely 2mm wide - in late winter through to summer.
Here's an image of the bush.
Blunt Sandalwood
Blunt Sandalwood

Santalum obtusifolium
Identified by its discolourous* and recurved leaves it is the only species of this genus in the Blue Mountains.
The images captured here are between flowering in November and maturing of the fruit in late summer. The flowers are white and the mature fruit is purple.
[* discolourous: coloured differently on the two surfaces.]

Family Scrophulariaceae

The NSW NPWS says in its brochure on the Euphrasia bowdeniae, that "Plants of the genus Euphrasia are rare, probably due to their parasitic nature".

Euphrasia bowdeniae
Euphrasia bowdeniae


Euphrasia bowdeniae only grows in the Upper Blue Mountains, and is classed as vulnerable.
It can be distinguished from other members of the genus by its leaves which have one set of "teeth", and its upper leaves are toothless.
Purple Eyebright
Purple Eyebright

Euphrasia collina ssp. paludosa
The Purple Eyebright is identified by its 3 pairs of "teeth" on its decussate* leaves.
[* decussate: pairs of opposite leaves that are 90o from the next pair.]
Purple Eyebright
Purple Eyebright

Euphrasia collina ssp. paludosa
Here is a white variant of the "Purple" Eyebright. It was growing with its more colourful siblings.

Family Stackhousiaceae

There are two species of this family in the Blue Mountains.

Creamy Candles
Creamy Candles

Stackhousia monogyna
Its white tubular 5 petal flowers identify it. The tube is 5mm in length and the flowers appear singly along the stem.
Slender Stackhousia
Slender Stackhousia

Stackhousia viminea
Its distinctive reddy-pale green tubular flowers identifies it. The tube is less than 5mm in length and the flowers appear singly or in small groups along the stem.
Here's another image.

Family Stylidiaceae

The hammer-like trigger (column) is used to pollinate any insect that lands on the flower. There are four species in the Stylidium genus that are found in the Upper Blue Mountains.

Narrow-leaved Triggerplant
Narrow-leaved Triggerplant

Stylidium lineare
The easiest of the triggerplants to identify due to its crowded basal rosette of narrow leaves which are usually about 25mm long and only 1 mm wide.
Here's another image.
Grass Triggerplant
Grass Triggerplant

Stylidium graminifolium
Identified by its leggy leaved rosette whose leaves are over 50mm long and up to 250mm, and whose leaves are 5mm wide.
Triggerplant
Triggerplant

Stylidium productum
Identified by its sets of leaves along its aerial branches. Younger plants are hard to distinguish from the Grass Triggerplant.
The image shows a flower that has two triggers.
Tree Triggerplant
Tree Triggerplant

Stylidium laricifolium
Identified by the leaves along its stems.
The colour of the flower varies from nearly white to pink.

Family Violaceae

The Violet Family includes 900 species of violets and pansies worldwide.

Native Violet
Native Violet

Viola hederacea
Found in sheltered and damp areas, it is a fairly common groundcover.
Its leaves are variable, and it is best identified by its white and purple flowers - which are 15mm wide.
Here's another image.
Sandstone Violet
Sandstone Violet

Viola silicestris
This species was only recently classified. Recognised by its small (6mm wide) pale mauve colour flowers, and its rosette.
Here's another image.
Common Dog-violet
Common Dog-violet

Viola riviniana
Introduced species (weed)
Its pink colours helps to identify it - plus its "clumpy" leaves.
Slender Violet-bush
Slender Violet-bush

Hybanthus monopetalus
The genus is called Spade Flowers.
This species is also known as Lady's Slipper, and its multiple flowers on each stem, distinguishes it from H. vernonii.
Tree Violet
Tree Violet

Melicytus dentatus
A tree to 4m high recognised by its 4mm long yellow bell-like flowers and thorns.
Here's another image.

Other families

Mistletoe
Mistletoe

Amyema pendulum
[Family LORANTHACEAE]
Clinging to its Eucalyptus host, with its pendulous Eucalyptus like leaves.
Forked Comb Fern
Forked Comb Fern

Schizaea bifida
[Family SCHIZAEACEAE]
The fronds of this unusual fern appear in winter and are 15mm wide.
Native Sarsaparilla
Native Sarsaparilla

Smilax glyciphylla
[Family SMILACACEAE]
Also known as Sweet Sarsaparilla, this climber is identified by the three veins on its leaves. Its tiny flowers become black berries that are about 7mm across.
Slender Rice Flower
Slender Rice Flower

Pimelea linifolia ssp. linoides
[Family THYMELAEACEAE]
Its 3cm wide flowers are glorious in close up. The linoides subspecies is a leggy plant and can be well over two 2 metres in height - and this can help identify it.
It is also known as Granny's Bonnet.
Olax
Olax

Olax stricta
[Family OLACACEAE]
This easily identified plant is a uniform dull light green in colour. Its leaves are in two rows on opposite sides of the branch. Its small flowers are about 5mm across.
Forked Sundew
Forked Sundew

Drosera binata
[Family DROSERACEAE]
A member of the Droseraceae family that includes the Venus Fly Trap, the Forked Sundew has 2, 4 or 8 "branches" that have glandular hairs that trap insects.
It bears white 10mm wide flowers in summer - whose long stems could be mistaken for belonging to another plant.
Black Sassafras
Black Sassafras

Atherosperma moschatum
[Family MONIMIACEAE]
Also known as the Southern Sassafras, this winter flowering tree is found near water in sheltered gullies.
It is the only species in this genus.
Here's another image.
Single Bladderwort
Single Bladderwort

Utricularia uniflora
[Family LENTIBULARIACEAE]
Bladderworts are carnivorous plants that take in and digest small organisms through their leaves. This species flower is 14mm wide and 9 mm deep. U. dichotoma is similar but has two flowers.
Small St. John’s Wort
Small St. John's Wort

Hypericum Gramineum
[Family CLUSIACEAE]
A sibling of the herb St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum).
The flowers are about 1cm across and the leaves near the flowers are appressed.
Old Man’s Beard
Old Man's Beard

Caustis flexuosa
[Family CYPERACEAE]
Easily recognised, Old Man's Beard is also known as Curly Wig.
Louisa's Mistletoe
Louisa's Mistletoe

Atkinsonia ligustrina
[Family LORANTHACEAE]
This endangered parasitic species is a member of the mistletoe family and is only found in the Blue Mountains.
It's a bush to 2 metres in height.
Its 12mm long fruit matures from yellow to crimson.
Rusty Velvet-bush
Rusty Velvet-bush

Lasiopetalum ferrugineum
var. ferrugineum
[Family MALVACEAE]
The distinctive flowers identify this genus. Its narrow leaves are about 10mm wide.
L. ferrugineum var. cordatum has ovate leaves that are up to 40mm wide.
Here's another image.
Headache Vine
Headache Vine

Clematis glycinoides
var. glycinoides
[Family RANUNCULACEAE]
A spectacular vine when in full bloom. Its flowers are 40mm across.
Its leaves have few teeth if any and its anther appendage is < 1mm - compared to Clematis aristata whose leaves are more serrated and an anther appendage > 1mm.
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