Purple Coral Pea p8190132 image 88KB
Pea Flowers, Orchids, Lillies & Irises
of the
Lane Cove National Park
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Pea Flowers, Orchids, Lillies & Irises
Families Fabaceae, Orchidaceae, Liliaceae* & Iridaceae

With over 1,100 species, the Pea Flower family is one of the largest in Australia.

There are about 1,000 species of Orchids in Australia and as many as 35,000 species worldwide - making it the world's largest flower family.

* Most of the Australian species in the Liliaceae Family have recently been reclassified into a dozen or so other botanical families.

The Iris family is represented throughout the world by freesias, gladiolis and irises - and in Australia by the Genus Patersonia.

pea flower botany
Pea flowers have five petals.
The standard or banner, two wings, and two petals, usually fused together, referred to as the keel.

An index to the images included below
Pea Flowers

Broad-leaf Wedge Pea
Broom Bossiaea
Common Hovea
Dainty Wedge-pea
Dusky Coral Pea
Fine-leaf Bush Pea
Golden Spray
Graceful Bush-pea
Hairy Bush Pea
Handsome Flat-Pea
Heath Phyllota
Heathy Parrot Pea
Large-leaf Bush Pea
Large Wedge Pea
Leafless Globe-pea
Love Creeper
Pointed Leaf Hovea
Purple Coral Pea
Rough Parrot Pea
Rusty Pods
Spiny Bossiaea
Variable Bossiaea
Orchids

Copper Beard Orchid
Dusky Fingers
Golden Donkey Orchid
Hooded Orchid
Large Duck Orchid
Large Tongue Orchid
Nodding Greenhood
Pink Fingers
Pixie Orchid
Purplish Beard Orchid
Red Beardie
Rosy Hyacinth Orchid
Sharp Greenhood
Small Waxlip Orchid
Splotched Hyacinth Orchid
Spotted Sun Orchid
Tall Greenhood
Tall Leek Orchid
Tiger Orchid
White Fingers
Lillies

Blue Flax Lily
Christmas Bells
Milkmaids
Rush Fringe Lily
Pale Grass-lily
Yellow Rush Lily


Irises

Leafy Purple Flag
Silky Purple Flag

Other attractions of the Lane Cove National Park

Eastern Water Dragon image 106KB

The Eastern Water Dragon is one of sixteen kinds of snakes and lizards that live in the Park.

Other lizards include the Southern Leaf-tailed Gecko and the Copper-tailed and Eastern Water Skinks.

The Eastern Water Dragon to the right appears a little skinny - this is because it is early October, and she has only recently emerged from hibernation.

[I have assumed it is a "she" as the males are red on their chests - like Spike.]

Eastern Water Dragons are found along the coastal watercourses of Eastern Australia.

To escape a threat, they will plunge into the water. So if you hear a splash while walking near a creek in the Park, it may be an Eastern Water Dragon.


Select the thumbnail image to see the full image.

- Pea Flowers -
Family Fabaceae

Bossiaea genus
Spiny Bossiaea image p9260067 74KB
Spiny Bossiaea
Bossiaea obcordata
This pea flower is characterised by its sharp branches (spines), and heart shaped leaves. Flowers in spring.
Broom Bossiaea image p9060028 109KB
Broom Bossiaea
Bossiaea scolopendria
A virtually leafless plant with characteristic flat stems. Similar to B. ensata (see our Blue Mountains peaflowers, but B. scolopendria has reddish wings and the flowers are larger.
Variable Bossiaea image p4020263 77KB
Variable Bossiaea
Bossiaea heterophylla
Flowering in Autumn, this, plus its variable leaves and crimson keel identify it.
The leaves vary on the plant and may be ovate or thin, and also vary in size.

Dillwynia genus
Heathy Parrot Pea image pa040282 79KB
Heathy Parrot Pea
Dillwynia retorta ssp. retorta
Probably the most common peaflower in the Park, and although flowering in winter and spring, there are invariably "spot flowers" throughout the year.
Its twisted perpendicular narrow leaves helps identify it. The leaves aren't hard.
Rough Parrot Pea image p9060057 79KB
Rough Parrot Pea
Dillwynia rudis
Dillwynias typically have broad standards, and keels that are shorter than the wings.
The Rough Parrot Pea (a name not in common use) is identified by its 15mm long rough leaves with the Dillwynian channel on top.

Hovea genus
Common Hovea image p8120068 85KB
Common Hovea
Hovea linearis
Flowering in late winter, this beautiful pea flower is also known as the Erect Hovea or Blue Bonnet. The latter being a delightful name.
Rusty Pods image p8120068 91KB
Rusty Pods
Hovea longifolia
While the Common Hovea is a small shrub to 50cm in height, Rusty pods is a small tree and can be over 2 metres high. It also has longer, shinier and darker green leaves.
Pointed Leaf Hovea image p8090269 100KB
Pointed Leaf Hovea
Hovea acutifolia
Distinguished from the Hoveas to the left by its wider leaf, it is also known as the Northern Hovea.

Pultenaea genus - Bush Peas
Graceful Bush-pea image p9260057 81KB
Graceful Bush-pea
Pultenaea flexilis
A mass of deep yellow flowers in spring. Its height (up to 4 metres) and flat pointed, occasionally concave, leaves identify it.
Dwarf Wedge-pea image pb070172 68KB
Hairy Bush Pea
Pultenaea villosa
Identified by its green keel and hairy concave leaves. Similar to P. hispidula however P. villosa's leaves if not concolourous (of uniform colour) then the lower surface is darker than the upper surface - vice versa for P. hispidula.
Large-leaf Bush Pea image p9140229 69KB
Large-leaf Bush Pea
Pultenaea daphnoides
A beautiful rosette of flowers - about 30mm across. Its leaves are 30mm in length. Besides its size, it can also be identified by the crimson "keel" under each flower - see flower on the right.
Fine-leaf Bush Pea image p9080323 81KB
Fine-leaf Bush Pea
Pultenaea stipularis
A 2 metre high shrub with a crown of golden pea flowers. Identified by its 1 cm long stipules (a small leafy growth at the base of a leaf) - see enlarged image.

Gompholobium genus
Golden Glory Peas
Broad-leaf Wedge Pea image p9060009 81KB
Broad-leaf Wedge Pea
Gompholobium latifolium
Spring flowers that are 30mm from top to bottom. Distinguished from similar Wedge Peas by the trifoliate broad flat leaves.
Also known as the Golden Glory Pea.
Dainty Wedge Pea image p7020235 70KB
Dainty Wedge Pea
Gompholobium glabratum
Its 10mm wide flowers have the most beautiful yellow colour. It is identified by its (usually 5) pinnate leaves and warty stems.
Compared to the trifoliate leaves of G. minus.
Large Wedge Pea image p9300240 69KB
Large Wedge Pea
Gompholobium grandiflorum
Similar to the Broad-leaf Wedge Pea (far left), but has narrower trifoliate leaves. If anything, despite its name, its flowers are a titch smaller.


Love Creeper image pc150197 68KB
Love Creeper
Glycine clandestina
This widespread climber is found in all eastern states. Its narrow long leaves helps identify it.
Handsome Flat-Pea image p8260230 83KB
Handsome Flat-Pea
Platylobium formosum
The opposite heart shaped veined leaves identifies this spring flowering pea flower.
Dusky Coral Pea image p9040354 97KB
Dusky Coral Pea
Kennedia rubicunda
A robust climber that produces exquisite crimson pea flowers in spring.
Heath Phyllota image p9080364 77KB
Heath Phyllota
Phyllota phylicoides
Phyllotas can be recognised by their long bracteoles - the leaf-like bract under the flower.
Flowering in Spring, its broader bracteoles distinguishes it from the Summer flowering Phyllota grandiflora.
Purple Coral Pea image p8190132 79KB
Purple Coral Pea
Hardenbergia violacea
Flowering in early spring, this magic climber has several cultivars - "Happy Wanderer" being one.
Also known as the False Sarsparilla.
Leafless Globe-pea image p9300082 57KB
Leafless Globe-pea
Sphaerolobium minus
Differentiated from S. vimineum by its shorter wings that expose its keel, and having only a hint of red on some flowers, and none on most.
The flowers are barely 5mm wide and long.
Golden Spray image pa200099 79KB
Golden Spray
Viminaria juncea
It is also known as Native Broom - and this describes it well. This leggy leafless shrub grows to several metres, and is spring flowering.
It is the only species in the Viminaria genus.


Small Waxlip Orchid

- Orchids -
Family Orchidaceae - also see our Orchids web page.

Although Orchids vary greatly in form, colour and size,
their flowers are composed of 6 segments. The outer
3 segments are the sepals; and inner three segments
are the petals. The third petal becoming a lip or labellum.


Golden Donkey Orchid image pa010128 86KB
Golden Donkey Orchid
Diuris aurea
Donkey Orchids are easily recognised by their donkey ear-like petals with two leg-like sepals below.
Tiger Orchid image pa100164 86KB
Tiger Orchid
Diuris sulphurea
This spring flowering Donkey Orchid is 30mm from the top of its petals to the bottom of its sepals. A key in its identification is the lack of a callus on its labellum.
Large Duck Orchid image pa200195 57KB
Large Duck Orchid
Caleana major
Resembling a duck in flight, this small orchid's labellum snaps shut against the column trapping the visiting insect and turning it into a pollinator - see the full image.
Tall Leek Orchid image p9150054 86KB
Tall Leek Orchid
Prasophyllum elatum
Also known as the Piano Orchid, this orchid occurs in all other Australian States except the North Territory. It can be identified by its long leaf stem.
Spotted Sun Orchid image p9140192 72KB
Spotted Sun Orchid
Thelymitra ixioides var. ixioides
Also known as the Blue Sun Orchid, it has dark blue dots on its upper three segments. The flower is 25mm wide, but needs a sunny day to open.
It is best identified by the finger like papillae as not all Spotted Sun Orchids have spots as this image shows.
Small Waxlip Orchid image p8190083 57KB
Small Waxlip Orchid
Glossodia minor
A small orchid that is 20mm wide. The flower stem is leafless - the leaf leaving the stem near the ground.
Nodding Greenhood image p8F149 71KB
Nodding Greenhood
Pterostylis nutans
Flowering in winter, this translucent green orchid stays "drooped". The flower is 20mm long.
Tall Greenhood image p7220178 88KB
Tall Greenhood
Pterostylis longifolia
Characterised by its long leaves and the multiple flowers on each stem.
Sharp Greenhood image p4210298 52KB
Sharp Greenhood
Pterostylis acuminata
Also known as the Pointed Greenhood after its pointed labellum. It flowers in Autumn with a single flower at the end of each stem - the stem has a rosette of leaves at its base.
Purplish Beard Orchid image pa070137 81KB
Purplish Beard Orchid
Calochilus robertsonii
Spring flowering, its thick purple beard at the top of the labellum differentiates it from the other Beard Orchids.
Copper Beard Orchid image pa200041 81KB
Copper Beard Orchid
Calochilus campestris
Spring flowering, the Copper Beard Orchid is identified by the two blue plates on its labellum.
Red Beardie image p9300118 80KB
Red Beardie
Calochilus paludosus
The lack of "eye-like" glands at the base of the labellum distinguishes this Beard Orchid from its siblings.
Splotched Hyacinth Orchid image pc250108 82KB
Splotched Hyacinth Orchid
Dipodium variegatum
Summer flowering, its green stem and dotted ovary* differentiates it from the other Hyacinth Orchids found in the Sydney Region - D. punctatum and D. roseum.
[* The ovary is at the top of the stem immediately
below where the sepals and petals meet.
]
Rosy Hyacinth Orchid image pc080183 62KB
Rosy Hyacinth Orchid
Dipodium roseum
Identified by its purple stem, curled back segment tips and lines on its labellum.
Its ovary is striped.
The orchid is 30mm across.
Here's another image.
Pixie Orchid image p6230144 61KB
Pixie Orchid
Acianthus fornicatus
A tiny orchid well hidden by is mute colours and shady locations. Also known as Pixie Caps, its basal leaf helps locate and identify it.

the Caladenia genus (Fairy Orchids, Lady's Fingers and Spider Orchids)
NSW Flora Online says that Caladenia carnea "hybridizes with C. catenata and C. fuscata,
so larger populations may incorporate confusing hybrid swarms."

just what the amateur botanist wants to hear ...
As far as I can ascertain -
  • C. carnea's labellum lobe doesn't protrude, its labellum tip is yellow and it tends to be pinker.
  • C. fuscata's labellum lobe protrudes and its labellum tip is white, and it is smaller.
  • C. catenata's labellum is far more vertical before it slopes forward.
Pink Fingers image pa070067
Pink Fingers
Caladenia carnea
A small orchid that is 20-30mm across whose colour varies from near white to dark pink.
Here is an image showing its distinguishing characteristics.
Pixie Fingers image p9130064
Dusky Fingers
Caladenia fuscata
Flowering in early Spring, Dusky Fingers' sepals and petals are less than 7mm long.
Here is an image showing its distinguishing characteristics.
White Fingers image p8F038
White Fingers
Caladenia catenata
This attractive orchid is 25mm wide and flowers in winter and early spring.


the Cryptostylis genus (Tongue Orchids)
There are 5 species of the Cryptostylis genus in Australia - two of which can be found in the Park.
The flowers mimic the female Lissopimpla excelsa wasp (common name is Orchid Dupe).
The flowers "dupe" the male into pollinating them.
They can be identified when not in flower by a single leaf protruding from the ground.
Large Tongue Orchid image pc080129 65KB
Large Tongue Orchid
Cryptostylis subulata
A distinctive orchid identified by its drooping crimson tipped curled tongue-like labellum. The labellum, which is 25mm in length, has a dark red bump on its lower back.
Large Tongue Orchid image pc080165 74KB
Large Tongue Orchid
Cryptostylis subulata
This is the reverse side of the flower.
Initially it had me thinking it was a different species until the penny dropped ....
Hooded Orchid image pb200179 81KB
Hooded Orchid
Cryptostylis erecta
This orchid is all labellum. The other petals and the sepals looking more like leaves. It is also known as the Bonnet Orchid and the Tartan Tongue Orchid.


- Lillies -

Blue Flax Lily image p9300201 74KB
Blue Flax Lily
Dianella caerulea var. producta
The most common Blue Flax Lily in the Park, distinguished from Dianella caerulea var. caerulea by its leaves and flower coming from along the stem.
Milkmaids image pa050177 65KB
Milkmaids
Burchardia umbellata
With a 15mm wingspan, the spring flowering lily has a sweet fragrance.
Here's another image.
Christmas Bells image pc010061 74KB
Christmas Bells
Blandfordia nobilis
A truly beautiful lily. Flowers in late spring and summer. The flower is about 4cm long.
It has a green erect three sided seed pod
that is around 4cm in length.
Yellow Rush-lily image pa050173 71KB
Yellow Rush-lily
Tricoryne simplex
A delightful spring flowering lily that's 15-20mm wide. The twisted flower after flowering readily identifies it.
Pale Grass-lily image pb130227 62KB
Pale Grass-lily
Caesia parviflora
Another lily that is stunning in close-up. The distinctive lily-type flower is about 12mm wide and bears three fine purple stripes on each petal.
Rush Fringe Lily image pb170089 62KB
Rush Fringe Lily
Thysanotus juncifolius
This species of the easily recognised fringe lily is identified by its lack of basal leaves and the striate stems. It is about 25mm across and only lasts a day.


- Irises -
Family Iridaceae - also see our Native Irises web page.

Leafy Purple Flag image p9300201 72KB
Leafy Purple Flag
Patersonia glabrata
Flowering for barely a day, the 50mm flowers of the Purple Flags can be from light blue to dark purple.
Silky Purple Flag image p9160126 70KB
Silky Purple Flag
Patersonia sericea
The leaves of the Silky Purple Flag are fan like and come from the ground; while the Leafy Purple Flag's leaves and flower stork are borne on a stem.