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Lane Cove National Park Wildflowers
Smaller Floral Families

Snake FlowerSnake Flower
Smaller Families - but certainly not lesser.

This set of wildflowers is "simply" those that belong to smaller floral families - of which there are over 100 families with over 340 species in the Park.

The largest family is the sedges (Family CYPERACEAE) with 35 species, followed by grasses (Family POACEAE) with 31 species. However, this website doesn't cover these families - yet.

The next most prolific are the daisies (Family ASTERACEAE) with 25 species.

Index to our collection -

Acid Drops
Angled Lobelia
Apple Berry
Austral Clematis
Australian Bindweed
Australian Bluebell
Ball Everlasting
Black Wattle
Blackthorn
Blue Dampiera
Blueberry Ash
Bridal Daisy Bush
Broom Milkwort
Carrot Tops
Coachwood
Common Sundew
Daisy-leaved Goodenia
Forest Clematis
Forest Starwort
Glandular Pink-bell  (Black-eyed Susan)
Heath Micrantheum
Heath-leaved Poranthera
Heathy Platysace
Ivy Goodenia
Lesser Flannel Flower
Long-leaf Star-hair
Matchheads
Narrow-leaved Hemigenia
Narrow-leaf Logania
Native Parsnip
Native Peach
Native Sarsaparilla
Northern Cranesbill
NSW Christmas Bush
Pale Sundew
Pastel Flower
Pomax
River Rose
Rock Xanthosia
Rough-fruit Pittosporum
Rusty Petals
Rusty Pomaderris
Scented Marsdenia
Scurvy Weed
Slender Rice Flower
Slender Violet-bush
Snake Flower
Spiny-headed Mat Rush
Stiff Cassinia
Sweet Pittosporum
Sydney Flannel Flower
Thyme Spurge
Tree Pomaderris
Trigger Plant
Variable-leaved Goodenia
Varied Mitrewort
Velleia lyrata
Water Vine
Wedding Bush
White Marianth
White Root
Wombat Berry
Wonga Wonga Vine
Woolly Xanthosia

Other attractions of the Lane Cove National Park

Whale Rock
Located next to Devlins Creek in North Epping, Whale Rock is a well known landmark.

The Hawkesbury Sandstone formation was also known as Lizard Rock, but Whale Rock is now the accepted name.

Family GOODENIACEAE
Snake Flower
Snake Flower

Scaevola ramosissima
Small summer flowering climber with distinctive flowers and leaves.
Blue Dampiera
Blue Dampiera

Dampiera stricta
Tiny blue flowers on a small plant - flowering most of the year, but best in spring.
Also see our Blue Dampiera web page.
Velleia lyrata
Velleia lyrata


Its lyre shaped bracts provide both its name and its key distinguishing feature. It is an uncommon species.
Variable-leaved Goodenia
Variable-leaved Goodenia

Goodenia heterophylla
Flowering from early spring, its leaves, although variable, are similar. The flower is about 10mm square.
Daisy-leaved Goodenia
Daisy-leaved Goodenia

Goodenia bellidifolia
Distinguished from the other members of the Goodenia genus by the lack of leaves on the flower stem.
Ivy Goodenia
Ivy Goodenia

Goodenia hederacea
Also known as the Violet-leaved Goodenia, it is best identified by the flower stem coming from a rosette of leaves. It grows along the ground.
Family POLYGALACEAE
Matchheads
Matchheads

Comesperma ericinum
A tall leggy shrub over a metre high. Its mauve flowers appear in spring.
Also known as Pyramid Flower, Pink Matchheads and Heath Milkwort.
White Matchheads
Matchheads

Comesperma ericinum
A white form of Matchheads.
Most commonly appears as mauve.
Broom Milkwort
Broom Milkwort

Comesperma sphaerocarpum
Also a member of the Comesperma genus, this fragile little plant has no leaves. The "wing-span" of the flower is barely 10mm.
Family CUNONIACEAE
River Rose
River Rose

Bauera rubioides
Also known as the Dog Rose, its pink flowers hanging down and its six leaves radiating from the stem identifies it.
Flowering in spring and summer, it prefers sheltered damp embankments.
Here's another image.
River Rose image p9230036 80
River Rose
(white variant)
Bauera rubioides
As the flowers of this plant are similar in size to the pink version (15mm wide), it isn't the much smaller Bauera microphylla whose flowers are less than 8mm wide.
Black Wattle
Black Wattle

Callicoma serratifolia
With flowers that resemble some of those of the acacia family, this beautiful tree grows over 10 metres high along watercourses.
It flowers in spring.
NSW Christmas Bush
NSW Christmas Bush

Ceratopetalum gummiferum
Distinguished at any time by its trifoliate jagged leaves, it bursts into colour in summer. Up to 5 metres high, it is a Christmas joy.
NSW Christmas Bush
NSW Christmas Bush

Ceratopetalum gummiferum
However, the NSW Christmas Bush produces white flowers. Its sepals turn to red in fruit.
Its 25mm diameter flowers are twice that of its sibling (the Coachwood).
Coachwood
Coachwood

Ceratopetalum apetalum
Once you can identify it - by its grey bark with white mottles, or its flowers in summer, - you will see this 20 metres tall tree in stands along the creeks of the Park.
It was used in early coach making, WWII .303 rifle butts and for the frame of the Mosquito fighter-bomber (an all wood construction!).
Family APIACEAE
Sydney Flannel Flower
Sydney Flannel Flower

Actinotus helianthi
White drifts on the sandstone ridges in spring.
Its flowers are about 50mm wide.
Also see our Flannel Flowers web page.
Lesser Flannel Flower5
Lesser Flannel Flower

Actinotus minor
A small plant with flowers up to 12mm across. Like its siblings, it doesn't have petals, the petal-like part are bracts.
Heathy Platysace
Heathy Platysace

Platysace ericoides
A low bush with leggy stems whose leaves are 5mm long, 1mm wide and pointed. The flower heads are at the end of the stems and have both male and female flowers.
Native Parsnip
Native Parsnip

Platysace lanceolata
Also known as Scrubby Platysace, the flower head of this summer flowering shrub is about 25mm across.
Carrot Tops
Carrot Tops

Platysace linearifolia
Flowering in late summer, Carrot Tops is best identified by the bouquet of tiny (3mm across) flowers at the end of a long and oblique stalk.
Woolly Xanthosia
Woolly Xanthosia

Xanthosia pilosa
A small plant with characteristic "woolly" diamond shaped leaves.
Rock Xanthosia
Rock Xanthosia

Xanthosia tridentata
A delightful little plant whose leaves have three tips. The autumn flowers droop and are hidden by the hairy bracts.
Family PITTOSPORACEAE
Sweet Pittosporum
Sweet Pittosporum

Pittosporum undulatum
A tree to about 8 metres in height, it has scores of white flowers in spring which progress to orange coloured berries by autumn.
Also see our Sweet Pittosporum web-page.
Rough-fruit Pittosporum
Rough-fruit Pittosporum

Pittosporum revolutum
Its yellow flowers and dull leaves distinguish it from the Sweet Pittosporum (to the left).
It is also known as Wild Yellow Jasmine.
White Marianth
White Marianth

Rhytidosporum procumbens
A small plant whose flowers are only 8mm wide. It is also known as Mary's Flower.
Blackthorn
Blackthorn

Bursaria spinosa
The thorns of this summer flowering tree become branchlets which bear the flowers.
Apple Berry
Apple Berry

Billardiera scandens
Flowering in spring its 20mm flowers become purple edible fruit. This climber is also known as Dumplings.
Family EUPHORBIACEAE

The Euphorbiaceae family has recently been divided into four. The families are :

See NSW Flora Online for more details.

Heath Micrantheum
Heath Micrantheum

Micrantheum ericoides
A tiny shrub that can be identified by its trifoliate leaves. Its male flowers have three anthers.
Thyme Spurge
Thyme Spurge

Phyllanthus hirtellus
A small shrub whose shiny and hairy leaves are about 6mm long, and are often bent at the tip.
The variety that has red male flowers (shown here) only occurs in Sydney's north.
Thyme Spurge
Thyme Spurge

Phyllanthus hirtellus
This image shows the cream male flower.
The Thyme Spurge is supposedly monoecious, but I have yet to find a plant that has both male and female flowers.
Wedding Bush
Wedding Bush

Ricinocarpos pinifolius
This spring flowering shrub produces female flowers followed by male flowers. The green ball on the above thumbnail image is the fruit.
The flowers are around 15mm wide.
Heath-leaved Poranthera
Heath-leaved Poranthera

Poranthera ericifolia
A small plant to about 30cm high, whose flower-heads are held at the end of long branching stems. Its recurved shiny leaves are about 12-15mm in length.
Family ASTERACEAE (Daisies)
Ball Everlasting
Ball Everlasting

Ozothamnus diosmifolius
Also called Rice Flower, Sago Bush and White Dogwood. This spring flowering shrub grows to over 2 metres in height. It is very similar to the Bent Cassinia (Cassinia uncata).
Bridal Daisy Bush
Bridal Daisy Bush

Olearia microphylla
A show of white 10mm flowers in early spring. Its leaves are tiny.
Stiff Cassinia
Stiff Cassinia

Cassinia denticulata
Identified from other members of the Cassinia genus by its shiny green toothed leaves that are recurved and are white underneath (see larger image). The leaves are typically 10mm long and 4mm wide.
Family LOBELIACEAE
White Root
White Root

Pratia purpurascens
A small plant whose flowers are about 10mm long. Besides its lobelia like flower, it is easily identified by the pale purple undersurface of its older leaves.
Angled Lobelia
Angled Lobelia

Lobelia alata
Pretty little flowers, barely 5mm wide, appearing singly on leggy stems. The leaves have two opposite bumps (glands?) half way along.
See the Angel Sword on our Blue Mountains Wildflowers web page.
Family LOGANIACEAE
Narrow-leaf Logania
Narrow-leaf Logania

Logania albiflora
Recognised by its sweet smelling white flowers on grey stalks that come from leaf joints.
Varied Mitrewort
Varied Mitrewort

Mitrasacme polymorpha
These flowers are less than 10mm wide. The orange flower bud is shaped like a bishop's hat - which is called a mitre - thus its name.
Family RANUNCULACEAE
Austral Clematis
Austral Clematis

Clematis aristata
Another stunningly symmetrical flower in close up. This climber is distinguished from the Forest Clematis by its "toothed" leaves and the long appendage on its anthers. It flowers in spring.
It is also known as Traveller's Joy.
Forest Clematis
Forest Clematis

Clematis glycinoides var. glycinoides
Also known as Headache Vine, it is identified by its smooth edged leaves and the short appendage on its anthers.
Flowering in late winter, its 25mm wide flowers appear earlier than the Austral Clematis.
Forest Clematis
Forest Clematis

Clematis glycinoides var. glycinoides
The seeds of the Clematis are stunning.
This is an image of the Forest Clematis showing the dozen or so achenes (1 seeded fruit) each with a long wispy tail.
Family RHAMNACEAE
Rusty Pomaderris
Rusty Pomaderris

Pomaderris ferruginea
The members of the Pomaderris genus are difficult to distinguish - the leaves and the flower colour provide the vital clues. The dark brown hairy branches assist identify this species.
Tree Pomaderris
Tree Pomaderris

Pomaderris intermedia
The Tree Pomaderris is initially identified by its 10cm long, non-toothed leaves and hairless top surface. From there, its yellow flowers with petals and the tertiary veins on its leaves distinguish it from P. discolor.
Family DROSERACEAE (Sundews)
Common Sundew
Common Sundew

Drosera spatulata
Its flowers are around 7mm wide. It is also called the Rosy Sundew as its flowers are occasionally pink.
Common Sundew
Common Sundew
(leaves)
Drosera spatulata
Best identified by its 15mm long spatula shaped leaves - and thus its botanical name. One of the most common sundews, it is found in eastern Australia, New Zealand and east Asia.
Pale Sundew
Pale Sundew

Drosera peltata
A tiny flower, barely 10mm across, adorns this carnivorous plant. Distinguished from Drosera auriculata (Tall Sundew) by its hairy sepals.
Pale Sundew
Pale Sundew
(leaves)
Drosera peltata
The drops at the ends of its leaves are sticky. The "tentacles" close up over any unwary insect. The entire leaf is 10 mm across; the centre 4mm.
Even Smaller Families
Scurvy Weed
Scurvy Weed

Commelina cyanea
Family COMMELINACEAE
Probably because it is similar to "Wandering Jew", this climber is also known as "Creeping Christian".
["Wandering Jew" is a weed, has white flowers, and belongs to this family.]
Wombat Berry
Wombat Berry

Eustrephus latifolius
Family PHILESIACEAE
The enlarged image shows the 1cm orange berries of this climbing plant. The Wombat Berry is the only species in the genus.
Wonga Wonga Vine
Wonga Wonga Vine

Pandorea pandorana
Family BIGNONIACEAE
A spring flowering climber, the bell shaped flowers are 20mm long and 10mm wide.
Blueberry Ash
Blueberry Ash

Elaeocarpus reticulatus
Family ELAEOCARPACEAE
Best known for its blueberry like fruit - see large image. The delightful flowers provide another name for the tree - Fairy Petticoats.
Slender Rice Flower
Slender Rice Flower

Pimelea linifolia
Family THYMELACEAE
Its 3cm wide flowers are glorious in close up.
The Royal Botanic Gardens' PlantNET database warns that it is "toxic to stock".
Also known as Granny's Bonnet.
Pastel Flower
Pastel Flower

Pseuderanthemum variabile
Family ACANTHACEAE
An unmistakable flower - this one had its photo taken from the top, so it is effectively upside-down. The 15mm flowers appear in summer.
Water Vine
Water Vine

Cissus hypoglauca
Family VITACEAE
Also known as the native grape, the yellow flowers appear in summer.
Native Peach
Native Peach

Trema tomentosa
Family ULMACEAE
Also known as the Poison Peach as it is toxic to stock.
Acid Drops
Acid Drops

Leptomeria acida
Family SANTALACEAE
Also known as the Native Currant, the 5mm wide green grape like fruit is shown in the enlarged image. The shrub is broom-like.
Forest Starwort
Forest Starwort

Stellaria flaccida
Family CARYOPHYLLACEAE
This delightful little herb actually has 5 petals not 10 - each petal being deeply split.
Its leaves help identify it.
One of its siblings is Chickweed (Stellaria media).
Native Sarsaparilla
Native Sarsaparilla

Smilax glyciphylla
Family SMILACACEAE
Also known as Sweet Sarsaparilla, this climber is identified by the three veins on its leaves. Its tiny flowers become black berries that are about 7mm across.
Rusty Petals
Rusty Petals

Lasiopetalum ferrugineum var. ferrugineum
Family STERCULIACEAE
Stunning flowers in close up - which look like a piece of fruit that has been partially cut into slices. Also known as the Rusty Velvet-bush.
Narrow-leaved Hemigenia
Narrow-leaved Hemigenia

Hemigenia purpurea
Family LAMIACEAE
A small spring flowering plant that's also known as the Common Hemigenia. Similar to members of the Prostanthera genus but distinguished by its leaves. The flowers are about 10mm "square".
Long-leaf Star-hair
Long-leaf Star-hair

Astrotricha longifolia
Family ARALIACEAE
Glorious in close up, each flower is 3mm wide. The erect shrub can be over 2 metres tall.
It is a member of the Araliaceae Family which includes the ivy and ginseng.
Northern Cranesbill
Northern Cranesbill

Geranium homeanum
Family GERANIACEAE
A small flower, in pairs (sibling not shown here). It has a distinctive geranium leaf.
Pomax
Pomax

Pomax umbellata
Family RUBIACEAE
This is the only species in this genera.
The flower arrangement, produced in spring, has 8-12 stalks, each of which has several flowers. The fruit is retained long after flowering.
Australian Bindweed
Australian Bindweed

Convolvulus erubescens
Family CONVOLVULACEAE
This spring flowering climber is 15mm wide and is also known as Blushing Bindweed.
Trigger Plant
Trigger Plant

Stylidium productum
Family STYLIDIACEAE
The hammer-like trigger is used to shower any insect that lands on the flower with pollen. Distinguished from similar species by its aerial stems. The flower is about 15mm in length.
Australian Bluebell
Australian Bluebell

Wahlenbergia gracilis
Family CAMPANULACEAE
Its tiny flowers (6mm across) distinguish it from its siblings.
Glandular Pink-bell
Glandular Pink-bell

Tetratheca glandulosa
Family ELAEOCARPACEAE
This species is classified as "vulnerable", and is best identified by its "hairy" sepals and stem.
The species of this genus are referred to as Black-eyed Susans.
Spiny-headed Mat Rush
Spiny-headed Mat Rush

Lomandra longifolia
Family XANTHORRHOEACEAE
Also known as Honey Reed, both its thorns and leaves can inflict pain. Very hardy and flowers in spring.
Slender Violet-bush
Slender Violet-bush

Hybanthus monopetalus
Family VIOLACEAE
The genus is called Spade Flowers. This species is also known as Lady's Slipper, and its multiple flowers on each stem, distinguishes it from H. vernonii.
Scented Marsdenia
Scented Marsdenia

Marsdenia suaveolens
Family APOCYNACEAE
Also called Scented Milk Vine, this summer flowering climber is distinguished by its white flowers - the other species are mainly yellow.
[The pink edges on the petals provides me with some doubt to its identity.]
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