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Lane Cove National Park Wildflowers
Banksias, Grevilleas, Geebungs & Hakeas
and other members of the Proteaceae family

Red Spider Flower Red Spider Flower
Family Proteaceae

Although the Family Proteaceae is "only" the fifth largest of the Australia flora in terms of the number of species, it boasts some of the most popular and well known - including the Waratah and Old Man Banksia.

The Grevillea genus, with over 350 species, is the third largest genus - after Acacia and Eucalyptus.

Many of the species below are very prolific in the Park.


Banksias
Fern-leaved Banksia
Hairpin Banksia
Heath Banksia
Old Man Banksia
Silver Banksia

Grevilleas
Grey Spider Flower
Pink Spider Flower
Red Spider Flower
White Spider Flower
Geebungs
Broad-leaved Geebung
Lance Leaf Geebung
Narrow-leaved Geebung
Pine-leaved Geebung

Hakeas
Blacknose
Bushy Needlebush
Dagger Hakea
Finger Hakea
Hairy Hakea
Willow-leaved Hakea
Other genera
Broad-leaf Drumsticks
Conesticks
Long Leaf Smoke Bush
Mountain Devil
Narrow-leaf Drumsticks
NSW Waratah

Other attractions of the Lane Cove National Park

Pennant Hills Fire Trail
The Pennant Hills - Whale Rock Walking Track is one of the more popular walks in the Park.

Beginning and ending at Pennant Hills Park this 5 km loop takes in open heath, woodland and rainforest.

Some advice on the walk -

It is best to walk in a clockwise direction as the track leading down to the Lane Cove River is very steep.
There are some causeways that may be awash after heavy rain.
Look out for "over enthusiastic" bicycle riders.

Having said all that, the walk is marvellous and most of the photos on these web-pages were taken on this track or on its many arteries. So take time and seek out the many floral delights on offer.


Our Proteaceae family Collection

Banksias - also see our Banksias web page.

Heath Banksia
Heath Banksia

Banksia ericifolia
Orange candle like cones in Autumn with Rosemary like leaves.
See also our Heath Banksia web page.
Silver Banksia
Silver Banksia

Banksia marginata
It gets its name from the underside of its leaves which are white and shine in the sun.
See also our Silver Banksia web page.
Old Man Banksia
Old Man Banksia

Banksia serrata
Distinctive cream cones in summer with serrated leaves - all growing on wonderfully gnarled trees.
See also our Old Man Banksia web page.
Fern-leaved Banksia
Fern-leaved Banksia

Banksia oblongifolia
Named after the brown underside of its leaves. Its 10cm flowers spikes appear in Autumn.
See also our Fern-leaved Banksia web page.
Hairpin Banksia
Hairpin Banksia

Banksia spinulosa
Flowering in autumn and winter, its hook-like styles (hairpins) come in black, purple, red, orange and yellow.
See also our Hairpin Banksia web page.

Grevilleas - also see our Spider Flowers web page.

White Spider Flower
White Spider Flower

Grevillea linearifolia
Small white flowers in spring and summer in sheltered areas - especially near watercourses.
Its slender long leaves helps identify it.
Grey Spider Flower
Grey Spider Flower

Grevillea buxifolia
Spring flowering and prolific in the Park.
Here's another image that shows its leaves.
Pink Spider Flower
Pink Spider Flower

Grevillea sericea
Produces vibrant pink flowers in spring.
Here's another image.
Red Spider Flower
Red Spider Flower

Grevillea speciosa
Magnificent crimson flowers in spring.
Here's another image that shows its leaves.

Drumsticks & Conesticks - also see our Drumsticks & Conesticks web page.

Narrow-leaf Drumsticks
Narrow-leaf Drumsticks

Isopogon anethifolius
Flowering in spring, its narrow radiating spoke-like leaves characterise it.
Broad-leaf Drumsticks
Broad-leaf Drumsticks

Isopogon anemonifolius
Similar flower to the Narrow-leaf Drumstick but is more common. It is easily recognised by its flat radiating leaves which end in a trident like fork.
Conesticks
Conesticks

Petrophile pulchella
Although looking needle like, its leaves are soft. Its cones are more oval than the Drumstick.

open Hakea fruit
Hakeas.

There are about 150 species of Hakea - all endemic to Australia.

Their distinctive woody fruit (seed capsule) distinguishes them from the Grevillea genus. The fruit of the Hakea does not open until the branch supporting it dies.

An image of the fruit can be shown by clicking the word "fruit" in the respective text.

Bushy Needlebush
Bushy Needlebush

Hakea sericea
Apply named, the bare 5cm needle-like leaves, at right-angles to the branch, distinguishes it from other Hakeas. Also known as the Silky Hakea, its bumpy horned fruit is 3cm in length.
Finger Hakea
Finger Hakea

Hakea dactyloides
Also called the Broad-leaved Hakea, its broad veined leaves identify it. The flowers are around 15mm across and appear in spring.
The fruit does not have horns.
Blacknose
Blacknose

Hakea propinqua
Appearing at first glance like a conifer, its red branchlets identify this early winter flowering Hakea. The name Blacknose, which is not widely used, refers to its warty fruit.
Hairy Hakea
Hairy Hakea

Hakea gibbosa
This winter flowering Hakea is identified by hairy branches and new growth. Its hairy needle-like leaves are longer (8cm) than the Bushy Needlebush, and its fruit is smoother.
Also known as the Rock Hakea.
Dagger Hakea
Dagger Hakea

Hakea teretifolia
Probably the most prickly shrub in the bush. Besides its sharp and firm 5cm long leaves, it is identified by its dagger shaped fruit.
It flowers in Summer.
Willow-leaved Hakea
Willow-leaved Hakea

Hakea salicifolia ssp. salicifolia
The Willow-leaved Hakea is a small tree to 5 metres tall. It is best identified by its spring flowers and its 25mm long fruit.
The leaves of ssp. salicifolia are >7 mm wide; whereas ssp. angustifolia's leaves are < 7mm.

Geebung fruit
Geebungs - genera Persoonia.

There are about 100 species of geebungs - all endemic to Australia.

Their distinctive bright yellow flowers and green grape like fruit helps identify them from other plants.

The word Geebung has been long immortalised in Banjo Paterson's poem The Geebung Polo Club.


Lance Leaf Geebung
Lance Leaf Geebung

Persoonia lanceolata
Identified by its lance like concolourous (same colour on both sides) leaves that are broader towards the tip.
Similar to P. glaucescens - but that species is restricted to the Picton/Berrima area.
Broad-leaved Geebung
Broad-leaved Geebung

Persoonia levis
Distinguished by its large smooth light green leaves, its golden flowers (10mm long) appear in late spring and are followed by light green balls of fruit.
Broad-leaved Geebung
Broad-leaved Geebung

Persoonia levis
This additional image is included to provide a close-up of the flower.
It is also called the Smooth Geebung, its younger branches are red.
Pine-leaved Geebung
Pine-leaved Geebung

Persoonia pinifolia
Its soft pine-like leaves quickly leads to its identification. The leaves near the flowers are shorter, and near perpendicular to the stem.
Narrow-leaved Geebung
Narrow-leaved Geebung

Persoonia linearis
The Narrow-leaved Geebung has broader longer leaves than the Pine-Leaved Geebung.

Other genera of the Proteaceae family.

Mountain Devil
Mountain Devil

Lambertia formosa
Spot flowering throughout the year, but especially in the warmer months, its red flowers can be easily seen.
Also see our Mountain Devil web page.
NSW Waratah
NSW Waratah

Telopea speciosissima
The magnificent floral emblem of NSW.
Waratah is aboriginal for "beautiful"; Telopea is Greek for "seen from afar".
Also see our Waratah web page.
Long Leaf Smoke Bush
Long Leaf Smoke Bush

Conospermum longifolium ssp. longifolium
Yet another flower that is stunning in close-up. Each floret is around 15mm wide. This species is identified by its long paddle-like leaves.
The ssp. angustifolium's leaves are not wide towards the end.
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