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Blue Mountains Wildflowers
Acacias & Myrtles
Here you'll find wattles, eucalypts and tea-trees.

Sunshine Wattle Sunshine Wattle
Acacias (family Mimosaceae)

There are an estimated 900 species of Acacia in Australia. And this includes the Australian Floral Emblem, the Golden Wattle (Acacia pycnantha) - which is not indigenous to the Blue Mountains.

The Blue Mountains region has about 60 species.

Index to our Acacia collection -

Acacia asparagoides
Blackwood
Hedgehog Wattle
Kangaroo Thorn
Lunate-leaved Acacia
Myrtle Wattle
Ploughshare Wattle
Prickly Moses
Spike Wattle
Sunshine Wattle
Swamp Wattle
Sweet-scented Wattle
Sydney Golden Wattle

Myrtles (family Myrtaceae)

There's 130 species of the Myrtaceae family in the Blue Mountains. The most prolific genus, of course, is the eucalypt or gum tree which has 70 species. Next is the Leptospermum genus (Tea-trees) which has 20 species.

Eucalypts have the distinction of giving the Blue Mountains its colour and therefore its name. The blue hue of distant hills is caused by fine droplets of eucalyptus oil in the air.

Index to our Myrtle collection -

Eucalypts
Blue Mountain Ash
Scribbly Gum
Silver-top Ash
Tea-trees (Leptospermum)
Paperback Tea-tree
Pink Tea-tree
Prickly Tea-tree
Small Leaf Tea-tree
Spider Tea-tree
Tantoon
Woolly Tea-tree
some of the many others
Darwinia taxifolia
Common Fringe Myrtle
Pink Buttons
Weeping Baeckea
Our Acacia Collection

Sunshine Wattle
Sunshine Wattle

Acacia terminalis
Although flowering for all except the summer months, it's in winter when it's at its best - bringing brilliant splashes of yellow to the bush.
The flowers are 1cm wide.
Here's another image.
Sweet-scented Wattle
Sweet-scented Wattle

Acacia suaveolens
Flowering in late winter, it does indeed have a gentle sweet smell.
Swamp Wattle
Swamp Wattle

Acacia ptychoclada
The terete (long and cylindrical) leaves identifies this acacia. It flowers in summer and autumn, and is found in swamps and next to watercourses in the Mid to Upper Blue Mountains.
Lunate-leaved Acacia
Lunate-leaved Acacia

Acacia lunata
Brilliant yellow flowers in spring, this wattle is identified by the 3-5 flowers in each globe, and the vein in its dull green leaves being off-centre.
Sydney Golden Wattle
Sydney Golden Wattle

Acacia longifolia
This spring flowering wattle is identified by two dominant veins in its long leaves (up to 20cm), and two or three less conspicuous ones.
Blackwood
Blackwood

Acacia melanoxylon
A medium size tree - growing to 30 metres, it is identified by the 3-5 or more longitudinal veins on its leaves.
Hedgehog Wattle
Hedgehog Wattle

Acacia echinula
By far the most prickly of similar species, this, and its brighter flowers and more pungent pointed leaves identify it.
It flowers from winter into spring.
Prickly Moses
Prickly Moses

Acacia ulicifolia
Earlier flowering (from April) and paler flowers helps identify Prickly Moses.
On closer inspection it has a marked gland angle and longer stipules.
Ploughshare Wattle
Ploughshare Wattle

Acacia gunnii
The smaller triangular leaves (around 5mm) help identify this little wattle.
It flowers from winter into spring.
Spike Wattle
Spike Wattle

Acacia oxycedrus
A small tree, with very sharp broad leaves. Stunning when in flower in early spring.
This image shows its opening buds and leaves.
Kangaroo Thorn
Kangaroo Thorn

Acacia paradoxa
Also called Hedge Wattle and was previously A. armata. Its thorns and leaves readily identify it.
This plant was found in Wollemi National Park.
Myrtle Wattle
Myrtle Wattle

Acacia myrtifolia
Flowering in late winter, it is identified by its broad red edged leaves. It is also known as the Red-stemmed Wattle.
This image shows its opening buds and red stem.
SAcacia asparagoides
Acacia asparagoides


This small prickly plant is identified by its very short peduncles (stalks). It is a threatened species and is only found in the Upper and mid Blue Mountains.
Its flowers are 10mm across and phyllodes (leaves) up to 15mm in length.
Here's another image and another.
Our Myrtle Collection
Eucalyptus genus

Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum

Eucalyptus sclerophylla
This species of the unmistakable Scribbly Gum is common in the Blue Mountains. It is also known as the Hard-leaved Scribbly Gum.
Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum

Eucalyptus sclerophylla
As the bark ages through the year, it goes from cream to grey, before eventually peeling off in strips in summer.
Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum

Eucalyptus sclerophylla
The combination of bark colour, sap and scribbles produces some amazing images.
Silver-top Ash
Silver-top Ash

Eucalyptus sieberi
Identified by its red branchlets and the veins of its leaves, this spring flowering eucalypt also has a purple ring around the edge of each flower.
Silver-top Ash
Silver-top Ash
(gumnuts)
Eucalyptus sieberi
The Silver-top Ash is used in the Eden's woodchip export industry.
It is also known as Black Ash.
Blue Mountains Ash
Blue Mountains Ash

Eucalyptus oreades
Magnificent! Its tall white trunk identifies it - together with the strips of bark around its base.
A photo can't capture its grandeur.
Here's an image showing its base.
Leptospermum genus

Woolly Tea-tree
Woolly Tea-tree

Leptospermum lanigerum
Very similar description to L. grandifolium. However, I believe the specimen shown here is L. lanigerum due to its very silky sepals and shorter leaves - many less than 10mm.
Pink Tea-tree
Pink Tea-tree

Leptospermum squarrosum
Similar in description to several species, but its larger flowers (up to 20mm) differentiates it.
It also flowers in Autumn, which helps identify it. But to confuse matters, it also flowers in Spring.
Tantoon
Tantoon

Leptospermum polygalifolium
Also known as the Lemon-scented Tea-tree due to the lemony fragrance of its crushed leaves.
Oil dots can be readily seen on its leaves.
It produces a mass of flowers in early summer.
Woolly Tea-tree
Paperbark Tea-tree

Leptospermum trinervium
Characterised by its paperbark bark, it's a small tree that flowers in late spring/early summer.
The flowers are 10-15mm across.
Here's another image that shows its pubescent (soft covering of soft weak hairs) new growth - both branches and leaves.
Prickly Tea-tree
Prickly Tea-tree

Leptospermum juniperinum
This shrub is identified by its prickly leaves - its new growth is not prickly and has long appressed hairs.
The leaves and flowers are held very tightly to the branches - as this image shows.
The 10mm flowers appear in late spring.
Spider Tea-tree
Spider Tea-tree

Leptospermum arachnoides
Being prickly it can be confused with L. juniperinum, however there are several marked distinctions -
  it has rough bark;
   leaves are occasionally twisted;
  each flower is at the end of a branchlet, and has a rosette of leaves.
Small Leaf Tea-tree
Small Leaf Tea-tree

Leptospermum parvifolium
A small variety of tea-tree (up to 2m high) whose leaves are less than 1cm long and whose petals are barely 5mm.
other Myrtles

Common Fringe Myrtle
Common Fringe Myrtle

Calytrix tetragona
This plant is found across the southern states of Australia and into Queensland. The thread coming from the tip of each of the five sepals is known as an awn. The petals are about 5mm in length.
Darwinia taxifolia
Darwinia taxifolia

Darwinia taxifolia
The two patches of Darwinia taxifolia I have found in the upper Blue Mountains, are on the most exposed terrain possible.
This hardy plant flowers in winter and spring.
Pink Buttons
Pink Buttons

Kunzea capitata
Kunzeas are distinguished from Tea Trees by the long style coming from the centre of the flower. K. capitata is differentiated from K. parvifolia by its longer leaves - 4-9mm versus 1-4mm.
Pink Buttons is also known as Heath Kunzea.
Weeping Baeckea
Weeping Baeckea

Baeckea linifolia
The 5mm wide flowers appear in summer.
The shrub is up to 2 metres high and its weeping form distinguishes it.
Here's another image.
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